Making Things Easy in CRM

PostedOn: 2018-01-03 11:43:28

Abandonment is a major quandary in the customer journey. This is most obvious in the web where many customers simply walk away from the sales process, but it is also a problem with live sales as well. For whatever reason, the customer simply doesn’t complete the transaction. 

While there are many reasons for abandoning a sale, some of them are under your control. You can help the customer consummate the sale by the way you run your operation. 

The key point in designing the shopper journey is to make it as easy as possible. Everything from initial contact to the sale and after should flow freely for the customer. 

This starts with the process flow. Whether the customer is interacting with a live salesperson or a web site, the process should be designed as straightforward as possible. There should be as few decision points as possible for the customer and the number of choices at each decision point should be kept to a minimum. 

Customers hate to wait and if you make them wait they’re likely to abandon the sale. This is especially true of phone sales. Leaving a customer on hold is a deal killer. Transferring calls is almost as bad. So is shuffling customers among web pages. Make your response to the customer as undeviating as possible and you’ll lose fewer customers. 

Don’t bother the customer with superfluous questions, especially in the first part of the sale process. The customer should be goal focused at that point and you don’t want to disturb that focus. 

Customers will have questions and they expect answers promptly. This is a special problem with web pages. Here the answer is as FAQ file with clear, simple answers to common questions. This should be backed up by a make conversation or email feature for the not-so-common questions. Again, the goal is to keep the customer focused on the sale. 

Grouches turn people off. Strive for a pleasant professional tone in all your dealings with customer through whatever the channel. 

Speed is important to customers. Your goal should be to entire the transaction as quickly as possible without having the customer feel rushed or slighted. 

Limit unnecessary choices. Give the customer the choices he or she needs, but don’t weigh them down with extra decisions they really don’t need. 

Limit in turn collection in the sale process, especially online. Remember that the data you are collecting is for your benefit, not the customer’s. Design your data collection carefully to eliminate unnecessary questions. This is especially true in the final step of the sale where you collect credit card information. perceptibly you need some data but limit the questions you don’t absolutely need answered. 

Decide what services you can offer to make life easier for the customer. This can include home delivery, or even carrying the box out to the customer’s care. 

The purpose of all this is to make the customer familiarity as easy and pleasant as possible. This isn’t just a matter of this sale. It builds customer loyalty and encourages to come back again, whether all the way through the web, over the phone or at a brick-and-mortar store.